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Can a person with HIV have a child?


from my understanding the HIV virus lives in semen. knowing that semen is only used to "transfer" the sperm to the egg, cant a person get still have the sperm reach the egg somehow? please let me know..

Yes. But there will be a very very high possibility of your child getting aids.

yes and the child has HIV too

yes and the child wont necces have HIV

Yes, and the child will more than likely have it as well.

yes but it is likely that the child will have HIV too.

I would suggest not to have any children if your infected with HIV. Why should you take that risk of making a child miserable for the rest of their life.

Most likely yeh, but the child will have the HIV as well so there's no point of getting pregnant if you got HIV...

yes, and then the kid most likely willl have HIV

yea they can

The child may or may not have HIV there's a good risk though!

yes and your child most likely will have it too

Yes. The child will have a 50/50 chance of having the virus as well.

Yes a person with HIV can have a child it does not effect conception at all except for the increased likelihood of the child being born HIV positive. And no the child is not automatically positive either. There are many children born from HIV and AIDS infected people who are not positive.

yes they can and the child won't die either. HIV only weakens and dialbles the immune system. with no germs exposed to the unborn baby, it can't die.

YES U CAN, WHY DO U THINK THERE ARE SO MANY DIEING CHILDREN ALL OVER THE WORLD?
THE KID HAS A 50 50 CHANCE OF GETTING THE VIRUS UNLESS U BREAST FEED IT AND THE MOTHER HAS THE VIRUS BECAUSE THEN U PASS IT ON.

Gotta have babies. Here comes another poor soul dying in some institution I have to pay for.

yes but if you mean legally I dont think its been ruled illegal yet but wait they may make that a law too.
I do know in Africa which has the highset rate of infection I believe. They have a drug now when given at birth I think it is stops the hiv from spreading in the infant I saw that on a documentary recently.

yess a person with HIV could have a baby but there is a huge risk in the baby having HIV as well. But there have been cases in which the baby has come out and they are healthy and they dont have HIV!

First of all the HIV virus lives in the blood and is transferred thru bodily fluids.... second a person can get pregnant if they have HIV or the other has HIV, and third the child will most likely have it when born. They were doing research on children immunity to the HIV, because it was thought that if a child was born to an infected mother that the child would produce antibodies to fight the disease thus leaving them immune, but that's not the case. the child has the same immune system as mother until about 3 months after birth... most likely the child will be born with HIV.

It is a possibility but they have special HIV prevention treatments for mothers in this exact situation. Sometimes the child doesn't contract the disease.

They can - but shouldn't. The child will be growing up only to know that someday it will die early because of its having HIV from its parents.

A person who has HIV can still get pregnant. When AIDS was fisrt discovered, most pregnant women passed the virus on to their child. Now there are medications that a woman can take during pregnancy to reduce the babies risk of infection.

Honestly, I believe if I remember correctly, a woman can have a child but during her pregnancy she must take special medicine that will keep the baby at low risk of getting it. There are babies born all the time with no sign of HIV. As long as the mother stays on top of her prenatal care and treatment she should be fine usually.

es, and your baby does not alllways become a receiver of the disease. Go to an HIV specialist and they will tell you the same thing. It is not allllways passed on to the child- so don't listen to everything you hear. Today is a long way from yesteryear when the baby automatically was born with the disease. God Bless and good luck. Just get some good TRUTHFUL info and your mind will be put at ease, my friend.

I personally would not take the risk. I have provided you with information from several sites with different options. Please read this information, talk with your doctor and make a educated decision.

Can HIV be transmitted from a mother to her baby?
An HIV positive woman can transmit the virus to her baby during pregnancy, labour and delivery, and through breastfeeding. If she takes no preventive drugs and breastfeeds then the chance of her baby becoming infected is around 20-45%.

Can this risk be reduced?
Modern drugs are highly effective at preventing HIV transmission during pregnancy, labour and delivery. When combined with other interventions, including formula feeding, a complete course of treatment can cut the risk of transmission to below 2%. Even where resources are limited, a single dose of medicine given to mother and baby can cut the risk in half. AVERT is currently running a campaign to ensure that all women have access to these drugs.
A woman who knows that she or her partner is HIV positive before she becomes pregnant is better able to plan ahead. If she does not want to have a child then she should consider effective contraception. If she decides to become pregnant then early interventions may be able to help protect her, her partner and her baby. Doctors will be able to advise which interventions are best suited to her situation, and whether she should adjust any treatment she is already receiving.
Pregnancy does not make a woman's own health worse in respect of HIV. Being pregnant may cause her CD4 count (see below) to drop slightly, but it should return to its pre-pregnancy level soon after her baby is born.

This from the site that rington2000 provided, not exactly stated as he stated it........so maybe you shouldn't be answering this question either.
HIV can be transmitted from an HIV-positive woman to her child either during pregnancy, or during labour and delivery, or by breast-feeding. In Europe and the USA, about 15 to 20 per cent of babies born to HIV-positive women who are not taking anti-HIV drugs are infected. In most cases, HIV is thought to be transmitted during the last weeks of pregnancy or during delivery.

yes, a person with HIV can have a child but the fetus may have the HIV too because HIV crosses the placenta barrier.=)

none of you should be answering this question because none of you know what your talking about. the HIV virus would not infect the egg but the woman having sex. if she fell pregnant , doctors usually insist on a c section as it drastically reduces the chance of whats known as vertical transmission.


good advice Vera, go to a dr

Yes you can still have a baby. The baby may or may not be exposed to it. Just because you have HIV does not mean that you should not have children. You can talk to a doctor and they will let you know how to go about the situation.

Please read this information and visit the website I found it on.

How perinatal HIV transmission happens

"A fetus (your baby from 8 weeks gestation until birth) or newborn can become infected with HIV through contact with virus in their mother鈥檚 blood, cervical and vaginal secretions, and breast milk. It鈥檚 the mom鈥檚 HIV status that matters, not the father鈥檚鈥擧IV transmission to babies is all about the virus in their mom鈥檚 fluids, not in their father鈥檚 semen.

Many people are misinformed about the risks of perinatal HIV transmission, including many healthcare providers. Some people mistakenly believe that all babies born to HIV positive women will be infected, or that HIV positive women are too sick to have healthy pregnancies and give birth to healthy children. Many people also don鈥檛 know that there are ways to greatly reduce the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission. About 25% of children born to HIV positive women who receive no treatment or interventions against perinatal HIV transmission become infected with HIV鈥攖hat means an average of 25 out of 100 babies, or 1 in 4, can pick up HIV from their mothers during pregnancy, birth, or afterward from breastfeeding. But perinatal HIV infection rates can drop to as low as 1% or 2% for babies whose mothers are able to use combination antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy, AZT or nevirapine prophylaxis during labor and after birth, and choose the birth option that鈥檚 safest, according to maternal viral load levels, for both mother and baby."

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